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ADD Aspergers Anxiety Psychologist Counseling Testing Dallas

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Dr. R Says...

Asperger’s in Adults: You think you know the faces of Asperger’s Autism

ADD Aspergers Anxiety Psychologist

0:01

ourselves axles

0:03

if a mind like mine raised some questions for you to stay with us we've

0:07

assembled a group of people who can help you answer them

0:10

will continue to discuss attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or a d_h_

0:14

d in adults

0:16

there seems to be an assumption that children outgrow the disorder but in

0:20

most cases that's not true

0:22

let's take a look at some eighty h_d_ statistics

0:25

from the learning disabilities association of canada

0:28

eighty h d is a neural biological disorder that interferes with the

0:32

person's ability to sustain attention to focus on a task and to control impulse

0:37

behavior

0:39

eighty h d is likely to run in families and seems to be passed down through

0:42

generations

0:44

up to five percent of children in canada have eighty h d

0:48

blazer affected up to four times more often than girls

0:52

and up to sixty seven percent of children with a d_h_ deet may continue

0:55

to have symptoms as adults

0:58

so about two thirds of children with a d_h_ d still have the disorder when they

1:02

become adults the symptoms may change some they disappear completely like

1:07

hyperactivity but the problems with attention and impulsivity often remain

1:12

so what is life like for adults with a p_h_d_

1:15

what challenges do they face in post secondary school on-the-job and in their

1:20

personal relationships

1:22

what treatments and resources are available for adults and what happens if

1:26

they don't get the help they need

1:28

i'm joined by four people who can help us understand

1:32

karen o'donnell is the writer producer and director of a mind like mine

1:37

it's her third documentary on eighty eighty a subject she is passionate about

1:42

both karen and her son had a d_h_ d

1:45

caleb donal is caring son he was diagnosed with a d_h_ d at the age of

1:50

seven and has been learning to cope with the disorder ever since

1:54

daniel dejar de was also diagnosed as a child and continues to struggle with

1:59

eighty h_d_ in adult hood

2:01

he's here to shed some light on the difficulties he's faced

2:05

and finally i'm joined by doctor timothy bill ke he's a psychiatrist who

2:09

specializes in eighty h t in adults he's also director of the n_ terry o bill ke

2:14

eighty h_d_ clinics where he's assess more than three thousand people

2:19

if you're watching us on television will only be here a few more minutes then the

2:23

discussion will continue online only

2:25

so please make your way to t_v_ o dot org where you can watch this show

2:30

participate in a life chat

2:32

and send your questions to our panel if you'd like to phone us our toll free

2:36

number is one triple eight eight nine one one one nine five

2:42

welcome everybody thank you for being here tonight congratulations on your

2:46

film karen thank you

2:47

now your first two films uh... focused on children with a dat this one is about

2:52

adults life

2:54

well i really felt that it was only necessary to go into that arena because

2:58

as i learned more myself

3:00

and doing the films

3:02

it was very obvious that

3:05

general society just seem to think that it went away and

3:09

but i knew that that wasn't true plans are so i thought that i had to prove

3:13

ways to that and i wanted to go into the adultery and to her

3:17

nancy what would happen

3:19

now kaelin daniel you are both diagnosed as children with a d_h_ d and you've

3:23

been coping with it for a long time kale ask you first

3:26

how is it different for you now that you're a young held

3:32

asking myself isn questions no

3:35

and save garland gotten a lot better add up

3:37

or assessing my own behavior

3:40

or something that i've worked on consciously

3:43

and

3:44

and also my attitude towards had towards it in general has changed and i

3:48

approached it extremely negatively before

3:51

has really stuck on the whole normal

3:53

aspects and as i want to be normal i don't want

3:57

to affect me anymore and i just tried to do my best to get away get rid of it and

4:01

now i focused more positively on and how can i use

4:04

and how can i make it work for me

4:06

and living a lifestyle that

4:08

uh... cooperates with such a lot he's here in this

4:12

kind of this is the place and i are now asking myself those kind of questions

4:15

all right then you know what about you know has it changed for you

4:18

on what i have found it difficult to testing with social skills and adult

4:23

arena

4:23

and it's also been difficult to

4:26

fit in it workplaces and it's been difficult in that aspect as well

4:30

i've also found that time management organizing can be quite difficult so ice

4:35

to miss a lot of appointments and it wouldnt usually revolve around that dot

4:40

aspect organizing and

4:42

in getting things done focusing staying on pass gun appropriate behavior

4:48

appropri times such alright ok timothy and ask you in just a minute what what

4:52

eighty h_d_ looks like an adult

4:54

but i have to stop us for just a minute

4:56

we are about to leave your television screens but we are going to continue

5:00

this conversation online

5:02

please go to t_v_ o dot org

5:04

you will find this discussion alive chap

5:07

and you'll find a place to submit your questions to our panel

5:11

so we'll see you online

5:13

t_v_ o dot org

5:25

today we had seemed to think of fat when we talk about children with eighty h d

5:29

we often think of her child who is hyperactive who

5:32

is easily distracted what does it look like in adults

5:36

well that's a great question there's a change over time so a lot of the

5:41

hyperactivity does go away

5:42

although adults consumer worker quite workaholic like a little driven they

5:48

feel they can see a restless inside

5:50

um... they might pay some a cell phone with the blackberry

5:54

but the most predominate ng symptoms as we've just heard would be distracted

5:58

bility

5:58

short working memory problems organization

6:02

a sense of time this often very impaired so time is very more first-time drips

6:07

away people often running late

6:10

so there's an increase loading in an adult's life on these very important

6:14

executive functions working memory insult for we say those symptoms become

6:18

worse

6:19

i don't think they become worse but there's an increased emphasis on short

6:24

term

6:26

timelines are often paper related getting things in on time

6:29

so it makes it look like it's worse but it's an increase what we call cauldron

6:33

of loading

6:34

then adults life

6:35

and without any kind of help you're on your own basically right which happens

6:39

to all adults we end up with more on our plate but you're saying it so becomes

6:43

more obvious it's more obvious moved in with the diagnosis then we look at

6:47

periods for its impact on a person's life so

6:49

stepping waiting university

6:51

you have to move on your own activity of daily living getting the class in the

6:55

right time all these things become quite problematic within the workplace

7:00

forgetfulness conventional a lot of trouble either ever any new symptoms

7:04

shelf

7:05

adults that weren't there before not necessarily noon but uh... i think with

7:10

adult a_b_c_ because the descriptor attention deficit regret to his original

7:14

very good descriptor

7:16

because these guys have an attention span

7:18

so i think it's the context

7:21

we'd like to think of it is a fast mind not

7:24

an attention deficit mind

7:26

or

7:27

you can think of it as an contrast deficit so

7:29

if somebody with a d_h_ tease very interested in something they can focus

7:33

for long periods of time

7:35

it's really more in the boring everyday mundane tasks that they have a lot of

7:39

trouble it is something that can be problematic is impossibly

7:43

song adult

7:45

population people with adult a_d_d_

7:47

uh... having a little bit of impulsivity

7:50

driving a car coming people often conversations using a drug compulsively

7:54

all these things have been consequences of inhalt slight right of course okay we

7:58

have a nag email that's question is coming by email

8:01

uh... i am one of those people who is chronically late somewhat disorganized

8:06

and a world-class procrastinator

8:08

but i do manage to eventually get things done usually even on deadline

8:12

might i have eighty h d

8:14

how does one tell the difference between regular challenges

8:18

and those attributed to a dat this is from somone in toronto

8:23

posterity chairman we'll see

8:25

when everyone has to say about that so

8:27

people will be dede tells us to use that term generically the chronically late

8:32

rb underestimate the amount of time things take

8:35

believe everything for the last minute so it becomes an ammo for them for so if

8:39

this person

8:40

is like that words a chronic ruby is a problem and as a consequence to get into

8:45

trouble getting to work untie

8:48

relate allowed

8:49

university students getting things on time leaving extensions

8:52

uh... driving around time urgent

8:54

if that's a pervasive

8:56

quality that they've had a lifelong

8:58

then that could be a assign a symptom of aviation okay so you use the word

9:03

chronic

9:03

that they are like the keyword hits a persistent one n you have to demonstrate

9:08

that that as a consequence of these difficulties it impacted on a person's

9:11

life

9:12

so a little bit of it would be one thing but this is crime

9:16

karen after years of focusing on your son you found out that you have eighty h

9:21

t bulletin that was a

9:23

big surprise to me and i think that i am like this person that's email then com

9:28

you know that that's just my personality that was just too wise i am a c no unc

9:34

always had drug difficulty with time management forgetting things so i still

9:37

do but but actually organically

9:42

made chefs and i would have little patterns in place of that i know i'm

9:46

going to forget something so i would be prepared for when i did forget zero so

9:51

it's been you know it's impotent he was just a personality corcoran whatever why

9:56

did you get tested

9:58

rather than making this film it was a big shock because her and i started

10:03

actually working on this film

10:05

with another subject in mind and then

10:08

kanda side

10:09

this happened from just through the process of dealing with my son several

10:14

things happened

10:16

as he was preparing for university

10:18

which caused me to sort of followed a place with all the little things that i

10:23

had put into place over the years organically

10:26

we sort of being shifted away and and i didn't know what was going on until

10:31

their own aster another doctor about continuing with this filming and helping

10:37

me find a than adults are a woman who was not yet diagnosis but probably would

10:43

be diagnosed as an adult

10:45

and he said i a hope you won't be insulted but why isn't it you would

10:50

okay i know that there are well

10:53

writing work together and so i a thirty five

10:56

then i really do have to

10:58

such action

10:59

okay what does this information to you them that now that you know

11:04

it really doesn't mean a lot to me in the in my life i'm not going to be the i

11:09

don't have to change my job i think what it

11:11

does is

11:12

it makes me reflective over things to understand the choices over me

11:16

the job that i do is perfect for personality right important mind

11:22

issues or whatever you want to call them boomers it works and and i have a

11:28

fantasticks teen that works with me

11:30

to and we all you know sort of care each other loan and and i really think kills

11:35

said it before it's about being mindful and it's a really it it's really hasn't

11:41

changed my life

11:42

very much other than just

11:45

stepping back a glowing ok you know does that's what it's called right right we

11:50

have another question here that's coming in from john doubts that ever and

11:54

karaoke

11:55

i have just finished reading scattered mines by doctor kevorkian after talking

11:59

with him

12:00

have made to realize a shin i have a didi at fifty years old what affects

12:04

will medication how money both in limitations

12:07

and gains

12:11

okay so

12:12

a scattered mind

12:14

in a certain context

12:17

but i think the thing to nobody t_v_ is that people can be very focused

12:22

in them

12:23

interesting novel environment so i have police officers i have your positions

12:27

criminal lawyers

12:29

university professors so in that

12:31

unknowable stimulating environment

12:34

medicine may or may not be

12:36

elite circle

12:37

uh... it's in the everyday mundane tasks were people find it very repetitive

12:43

was not a lot of stimulation

12:47

the medicines that still work with kids now lessons work with adults very high

12:52

response rates

12:54

depending on the individual situation though because one size doesn't fit all

12:58

so for example my truck drivers and uh... paramedics and police officers

13:03

yet they probably would benefit from medication their own and

13:08

clinics so we see a lot of people who

13:09

on arrears for taxes just to pierce t so lots of difficulties that way so doing

13:15

the boring stuff yeah medicine could very much assist in that way

13:19

but about fifty percent of it is organizational strategies

13:23

knowing that you haven't

13:25

right it is a very important cornerstone

13:28

for people to

13:29

two-sided

13:30

shark is that you can understand it you can't learn from other people absolutely

13:34

harsh me adults are walking around and diagnosed do you think it's almost five

13:38

percent this is run by sort of all adult adult puppet have it have a d_h_ deep i

13:42

don't know it yeah that's run custer

13:45

snapping onto something

13:46

you know about five percent so it is really one of the commons things we've

13:50

seen an outpatient though

13:52

setting and this is also that data from europe

13:55

whether the world health organization's actually look to prevalence data and

13:59

helen powerful untreated aged he can be for people arriving in packs

14:04

well in that particular study to look at present is an

14:08

absenteeism as part of it that's where you don't go because of his in his where

14:12

people untreated with a_d_d_ would go to work

14:14

but about sixty percent of the time they're effective forty percent in the

14:17

hearts of the day dreaming drifting off

14:20

taking too long to complete asses

14:22

in amounted to about twenty eight days per person per year in lost job

14:27

performance so there's an example of

14:29

uh... under achievement for your own potential which i think is a

14:32

are very real possibility skirmishing

14:35

and i know we had an email about this before but i i want to ask this question

14:38

again because

14:40

some of us have

14:41

some of these symptoms

14:43

sometimes not

14:45

how do you know

14:46

that it might be a t h d or when is it just stop boring meeting or you know

14:53

another day on the job we're actually right so it's its

14:55

but we could all have some of these traits because the dimensional

14:59

dimensional traits right but for a t_v_ in the diagnosis you have to have not

15:03

sometimes it often

15:04

mhm you have to have the lifelong childhood onset

15:09

and as a consequence of the symptoms

15:11

it's impacted on selfesteem your achievement within your own potential

15:16

occupation academically so we have to demonstrate that's impacted negatively

15:20

so the majority of the house that i see will come in saying know what i don't

15:24

know if i have this i've got poor time management

15:27

uh... but if i do have this condition i want to be treated for it

15:31

uh... divorce rates require high

15:33

uh... chronicle self-esteem so

15:36

we have to have these things pervaiz of lee anniston packed okay

15:40

what causes a p_h_d_

15:42

well it's a no biological disorder doesn't spring based

15:47

we know a lot of both the receptors the bring receptors that you chemical

15:52

messengers dopamine and nor adrenalin or adrenaline

15:56

art that's implicated in a d_h_ d so it's a deficiency a v_c_r_ transmitters

16:01

essentially

16:01

the medicines that we have

16:03

enhanced these neuro transmitters so symptomatic lee people improve a lot

16:09

it's in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex which is the thinking part of the

16:12

brain

16:13

there is a delay in the maturation in these areas

16:16

we have a lot of really recently demonstrating that there are differences

16:20

in people with the steam

16:22

so they don't sort of light up that part of the brain when they have to pay for

16:26

full time

16:27

but our medicines helped them do that

16:29

so these are subtle brain based differences they'll recognize who eighty

16:34

percent genetic

16:36

eighty percent chance of genetic which is why the doctor said the karen

16:40

why not you so its rights it's really one of the more genetic conditions we

16:44

have

16:45

that new information how long it we know that all probably for thirty years is

16:49

that right is more genetic then ask mara breast cancer for example i'll take shot

16:54

the silver chalice diagnosed with a d_h_ devanshu the parents be defense of your

16:58

book

16:59

even if someone doesn't suggest them for it right they are usually looking for a

17:03

is that i rent or an uncle or something them alright until what has been the

17:08

biggest challenges for you

17:10

after having been diagnosed him

17:13

thumb

17:14

hired would be a chance for me definitely came because i was in school

17:18

at the time com

17:19

with my schoolwork americanization

17:22

nighttime

17:23

time management right waking up in the mornings realizing how long it's going

17:26

to take me to do something

17:29

underestimating how long it's going to do that i was falling short

17:33

too far over deadlines

17:35

him

17:37

and then i guess as i've gotten older

17:41

morning how to cope with it so i haven't found

17:44

complete norton strategies that i feel one hundred-percent confident with

17:48

burn down

17:50

it all depends on my environment really uh...

17:55

it's a little different baboon

17:56

how do you deal with the problems

17:58

uh...

18:01

actually i got it

18:03

island if i could talk miriam more businesses would have been doing with

18:07

leary's

18:08

without having been out of school and

18:09

now i'm trying to pursue my own

18:13

my own interests individually which i think also if i was in university that's

18:17

that's the kind of situation i'd be enright and hopefully i'd be doing

18:20

something that reflect my interest

18:22

so but right now i'm a i'm trying to read a lot and that sort of thing

18:26

bangalore

18:27

and by the but what i found is that i am instead of trying to like ways to

18:31

approach it more of it is a challenge likely have to get this book read

18:34

by a in a week and then next week he start another one and that sort of thing

18:37

give yourself challenges which is a great thing but also you're come to

18:41

realize that they don't

18:43

have to you don't have to be so abrasive with yourself where it may be trying to

18:47

get into a habit of doing that because that's where you used to in school and

18:51

this is the way it's done and then do it that way

18:54

it and if you can't do it then you'd have to try harder that sort of thing

18:56

but i've realized that you want

18:58

i guess that's read a book and and i get maybe forty fifty pages into it one day

19:04

and then i want to put it down but i didn't realize that i can still keep

19:07

reading i can can bring forever and

19:09

you know i mean right now in and so but but just that book that i need something

19:14

else rightly it's like like doctor bill kua saying it's uh...

19:19

interests deficit more it as opposed to attention deficit my attention is their

19:23

but i've just lost interest in that more easily than someone else were afraid to

19:26

tell your stimulation

19:29

zuni interested but once i am stimulated and i'm all the way they're so what i've

19:33

worse today i read like twelve books at a time

19:36

unlike of got a whole set of there's many people have been vetoed this is

19:40

absolutely not and you know i mean like i've been on death in the same books for

19:44

for months and months but there's no

19:46

you go between exactly and i've got the freedom to do that right now really come

19:50

not in a deadline for school if that's what's working for me and hopefully i

19:54

can find a balance between i want to do end up in school ok so that that seems

19:57

to be that strategies that you've come up with the admin trying to work with

20:01

are more than try to work against it and then obviously there's a balance would

20:05

you can't go completely one hundred percent with it but sure ok and daniel

20:09

in the film that we watched using to struggle quite a bit

20:13

yes more than kale

20:14

i guess you have a live why is that you think

20:17

having those because after my father had passed away

20:20

it was difficult for me to adjust to other a completely new environment with

20:25

cousins whom

20:26

i didn't know that well

20:28

they didn't have any children and they're both well into the forties so

20:32

they got me with all these disorders and

20:35

they didn't know how to handle it so for them

20:38

it was frightening frightening like you couldn't imagine and they didn't know

20:42

how to help me and i think that's what hurt them the most deserving couldn't

20:47

figure out why

20:48

or where i was coming from

20:52

but little by little

20:54

arlen somehow it did

20:55

deal with

20:56

the things that i had to deal with

20:59

the responsibility of the time management the working you know

21:03

everything that every other normal adult pass the word ruth what are your biggest

21:07

challenges

21:08

right now it's trying to find my place in the world trainer

21:12

get out of job that i can stick to because i found that

21:16

molson by jobs i've had they were either to boring or

21:21

my employers do not know

21:23

and i think speak up

21:25

about my prop my disorder dvd and whatnot

21:29

they would perhaps maybe they would have given me a little more lenient lenient

21:33

smear it it would have given me a little more patients you know

21:36

but i'm thinking in the future i'm a actually bring it up

21:39

because why not why shouldn't i bring it up why shouldn't i take a stand i

21:43

deserve it too

21:44

you my last job i was in video game testing when the best jobs i ever had

21:49

and i was making good money

21:51

you know why i got laid off

21:52

i forgot the locker workstation tune

21:55

he spoke to make it work

21:58

something simple

21:59

i cannot remember to do it

22:01

all and they even put up unaccustomed background you know that the americans

22:06

pollsters these to have to do what we want you they did that that is that we

22:10

want you to lock your doors that lead in acute does it why don't you feel

22:13

charitable char

22:15

still couldn't remember to do it

22:17

all right now in the film we see it's a it's a difficult moment to watch when

22:21

your cousin kicks you out

22:23

yeah those who heard yeah what was that like for you

22:28

pour my world apart and

22:30

i felt like i was falling down a pet

22:35

so i had to go through horrible things things i don't know when you can speak

22:38

about on the air because it was just too painful impersonal but

22:42

it taught me a lot

22:44

iggy me a real good way to call you know

22:47

and i think i need to be because

22:50

my father was villainy wasn't really able to give me either

22:53

the discipline and by me back then

22:56

i do work

22:57

as a teenager so i i never develop that

23:00

that value system of personal responsibility

23:03

that sense of

23:05

there's there's a type of behind them and it's time for work

23:08

and that's what i had to learn but

23:09

i had to rush it i think as a catch-up fast and my cousins

23:14

they tried but

23:15

sometimes i felt like it was too much pressure that i used to snap

23:20

and i'm going to move by love rages

23:23

that would frighten them to you know unending if they do not have

23:27

the knowledge or the expertise to deal with these things and you can just

23:31

imagine

23:32

how was for them

23:34

what do you think it will take up to turn things around for you

23:38

i think right now i'm trying to set up a support team the montreal because i

23:42

don't have adopted the d_c_ regularly i have no psychologist north atlanta list

23:47

nobody talked about my problems of modern any medication

23:50

so coping for me which i have a lot of anxiety

23:54

and this exile has become of compounded

23:58

stigma which is prevented me from having the self-confidence to go out of the

24:02

cheat my ambitions

24:03

and is preventing me from going out looking for work is that i had a resume

24:07

sitting on my people at the bus fare i have my pass whatever

24:10

i could get up in the morning and it is a hate

24:12

look at your school and find jobs today

24:16

but i don't go out

24:18

don't believe that ham worth it or i don't believe uh...

24:21

i would've takes or i don't think that they're going to hire me you know so i

24:24

go in there to sit back and brief

24:27

it's a good word for anything like this

24:29

and employer looks at u_n_

24:31

they're looking right at the u_n_ vacancy that you're nervous and so it

24:36

doesn't look good it doesn't look

24:39

professionalism look like you're ready so did his past your present to see you

24:43

next

24:44

and it hurts you know

24:48

what makes the difference between

24:50

managing

24:51

not managing

24:53

out full page d

24:56

well i think the approach to the diagnosis is multimodal

25:00

even so in our clinics

25:02

you really need to get to know people it's not

25:04

just a series of checklists and there's a diagnosis here's upheld to see what

25:09

happens

25:10

sonar clinics and other clinics throughout the world

25:14

getting to know

25:15

who it is that has the vb

25:17

knowing somebody from a three sixty perspective

25:20

getting to know their aptitude nor strengths the passions of dreams

25:24

getting a sense of a vocational trajectory

25:27

so if you have a dvd okay the bad news is maybe you're not going to be a

25:31

chartered accountant or book uh... so what's the downside

25:35

but when you have a nice way i'm so

25:38

but we'll see if i had the uh... let's find out what you do that

25:42

and everybody has gifts

25:44

and think those kinds of attitudinal strengths will act as a vocational

25:49

g_p_s_ for what you can do in your life

25:51

the couple bat with medication

25:55

file because often the response which is so high that within a a few weeks people

26:00

can

26:01

feel less distracted in that the medicines help people in the head of

26:05

themselves

26:06

to pay attention better the comeback to break break time they don't forget to

26:10

keys and so forth

26:11

and then selfesteem starts to build

26:14

the other thing you need to do is look for other conditions which may overlap

26:18

so we need to use a little bit notorious

26:20

in terms of coming along as a package

26:23

so was lost social anxiety up to twenty nine percent without arms

26:28

so for example social phobia so that may be inheriting a person from performing

26:32

well no job interviews he might want to treat that

26:35

mood problems also can corker

26:38

to treating these other conditions in our class we specialize also addiction

26:41

so it's up to fifty percent of the directions

26:43

so targeting addictions which may also be an obstacle two percent of persons

26:49

progression

26:50

so in everybody's different rehearsals individualize in your treatment

26:55

we see quite successful people holliman valves found american re and stocking

26:59

was abt

27:00

trainee harrelson in my book we're all going to be interviewing people who have

27:05

me dat

27:07

and these will be inspirational odd stories

27:11

kosovo really is a incident number of stories link together but what he did he

27:15

really is

27:16

and am i don't think it's the worst thing on the planet i think it certainly

27:19

can impair people

27:21

but also the treatments work extremely well that's multimodal highly

27:25

individualized i'll take karen what do you think what makes the difference for

27:29

people

27:30

honorable i gri with doctor book and i think that uh... once you realize that

27:35

you have it

27:36

and if you realize that it's not all that bad things are actual positives

27:41

that go along with it

27:43

'em that uh... you know ending do you have you have to be able to build your

27:48

own self-esteem and i know i stay in the in the film what i learned about myself

27:53

with that and i would be using

27:56

this hyper focus alan

27:58

fabindia because and it got me through it it gets me through on the on off a

28:04

lot of the work that i have to do in a very short period of time it's not a bad

28:07

qualities you know it's it's absolutely fantastic so by don't believe that it's

28:13

such a bad thing after all i know it's challenging biden if you are aware of it

28:18

there are ways through those challenges ok are just want to remind people if

28:22

you're watching us online at the panel is here to take your questions

28:26

you can submit one online in the ask the expert box below the screen or you can

28:30

give us a call toll-free at one eight feet eight eight nine one one one nine

28:36

five

28:38

alan a carrot week really hear about adults with a d_h_ d it seems to be

28:43

always about children why is that you think

28:46

well and i think

28:47

of i'll go back to when i first and at kato which was eight nine years ago

28:54

when i wanted to do that story i was told then or this isn't you know very

28:59

prevalent this is a

29:01

affects a small group of the population and some i think that we will be hearing

29:06

more about adults with attention deficit disorder i think that

29:10

the at the time is is right now and that there were more accepting

29:15

and we certainly have

29:16

bum professionals that are out there talking about it and doing great work to

29:21

understand the research and and and and writing books arrive adults and

29:26

celebrities

29:27

talking not about it

29:28

not we have a question here from john in sturgeon falls hasn't the diagnosis of

29:32

eighty eighty become prevalent since the advent of psychotropic such as ritalin

29:37

did this disease aids and he's put that in quotation marks exist prior to these

29:41

controversial but highly profitable drugs whether any scientific tests

29:45

but make that diagnosis

29:48

ten thriving answer a few months by heinrich often eighteen fifty six

29:54

german physician

29:55

noticed hyperactivity in a number of those kids

29:58

the first our treatment was nineteen thirty seven am strolls bradley that was

30:02

recorded in our control sky tree

30:05

so the first treatment i was a drug called and you can

30:09

so that precedes the onset of

30:13

drugs like ritalin and so forth real and i was a medication became available in

30:16

the fifties but we think that eighty h t has always existed within the gene pool

30:22

a christmas in people from very isolated gene pools moving populations

30:27

the eighty each deal is very similar and our population turn any other

30:33

culture we've seen people from singapore african scotland

30:36

prove and so forth worldwide worldwide anywhere you look for basically saying

30:40

incidents yep

30:42

friends writes a very very similar okay

30:45

and

30:45

are so

30:47

medications

30:48

we knew very early on part of the dopamine in the north kremlin they make

30:53

dopamine more freely available

30:54

and that allows the thinking part of the brains personal level prefrontal cortex

30:58

to light up and help people focus in inhibit themselves tonight so google in

31:03

bosnia was things

31:05

army

31:05

the real has a bad name it's not a particularly of good medication

31:10

so it health canada who has authorized four long-acting excellent medications

31:16

that very very high response rates okay

31:19

something i think that accounts for the skepticism because that is some

31:23

skepticism out there

31:24

you know what

31:26

i think the condition i think the skepticism

31:29

comes because the symptoms are so subtle so if you say to me up

31:33

product but none of the press to medical i run late

31:37

on forgetful

31:38

i think reflexively a lot of people would say it'll just make a list

31:42

proposed don't procrastinate rises a lot like saying to somebody's addicted to

31:46

nicotine maybe they should just stop smoking because it's bad for them or

31:49

something like that so the symptoms are not graphic the very subtle

31:54

and so it's easy for somebody who doesn't have a to sort of moral eyes and

31:57

say well

31:58

don't just don't forget stuff

32:01

so i think that part of it and can put people often

32:05

uh... which is why it's important

32:07

that these printed the celebrities are coming in saying that i have this book

32:11

okay cause this in trouble but now i fixed it up to robin diamond elsewhere

32:14

so detective p it is a real condition

32:18

so people didn't dispute

32:20

the diagnosis

32:21

she'd call up hourly

32:23

and tell them what to think about it because i think that would be an

32:25

interesting person sour right let's go to ablation missus i guess questionnaire

32:31

online i think both of you boys are amazing and full of strength facing

32:35

these challenges

32:36

had either of you reconsider the use of medication

32:40

then we'll start with you and then i'll ask you camp

32:44

yes i have reconsidered the use of it because i find that

32:48

unimpeded debasis i don't seem to have

32:52

the coping mechanisms in place to keep myself and check i find better

32:57

unbalanced

32:58

just generally moody emotional

33:01

nervous bankshares

33:03

uh... i'm not really able to focus on and any pasts really for a long time

33:08

it's just

33:09

difficult and i just get very scattered as you mention in your book scattered

33:13

mines

33:14

uh...

33:15

i think that so you may go back home as soon as you can see ring up but i'm not

33:19

sure if it

33:20

if it that that is what i need

33:22

so so that's the thing sometimes i don't know alike

33:25

isn't a good option or dinner is not a good option that's difficult part is

33:28

figuring out whether or not it's appropriate

33:32

and that you need a good doctor for because they need to get to know you

33:35

need to analyze your whole history n

33:38

for me is more complicated because i grew up here and ontario and now living

33:42

in quebec

33:43

so there's a problem with doctors in history reports and transfers of files

33:47

in a larger haha okay so that makes it a complicated issue that's why don't you

33:52

cannot be reconsidered

33:54

definitely

33:57

from

33:58

i have

34:00

i've always been a little uncomfortable with the idea bla medication deberg

34:05

great for me when i was younger and

34:07

that i don't doubt that intensify convinced

34:10

just my attitude towards that has changed now on the before it was more of

34:14

an issue of trying to

34:17

put the put the per diem

34:20

analysts say

34:21

michael disorder concrete under wraps and try to just

34:25

get rid of it as much as possible kinda level it out with with this medication

34:28

and now

34:30

more

34:32

bidyut at bally's now i have the time to be able to to to do this once i get

34:36

university maybe it'll definitely be a different issue and a half to reconsider

34:39

everything again but right now i'm trying to

34:42

really let my mind go the way it goes and

34:45

and pay attention to answer to that and and

34:50

really see the best ways that i can utilize it

34:53

because like i said that working with it seems so much better and it's it's a

34:58

unique perspective i think like that

35:00

uh... let them which is something that's interesting for me to pursue from

35:04

and uh... that's why i would consider medications on

35:09

well as as much as i'd like to say i'd like to consumer short term kind of

35:12

bases like ours really crunch time i like to do it

35:15

but i don't know if they work that fast acting in

35:18

it sort of thing i think what's very important to understand your own mind in

35:22

your own workings and if you agree to go on medication

35:26

change a whole lot of things around another thing to be bad but you have to

35:29

be spend that time again getting used to your own processes again and more

35:34

realizing that a lot more so right now i'm i'm comfortable

35:37

doing that with the way i a m

35:40

naturally let's say

35:42

and and there may be a time where where

35:46

i'd have to do this all over again while on vacation maybe

35:49

so won't be able to deal with at a university both for the time being under

35:53

fairly comfortable home

35:55

pursuing it the way anthony rumor

35:58

we have a phone call now from kristin on a lot higher crest

36:04

hi chris hi welcome to the show

36:07

high and what's your question for piano

36:09

but i don't know

36:12

twenty years

36:13

drying up

36:14

he he only learned

36:19

might i add one support everything was

36:25

bore

36:25

faster and more left over there is a huge political parties

36:31

recently unite if either the landing

36:35

by again warm toward my everyday life

36:38

but haven't really don't want to themselves

36:42

seven years old and i think the field

36:46

have the list

36:47

coming creeping back up on the so what section eight eight two get a better

36:51

graphics

36:54

on it as a young adult

36:55

okay thank you chris oh that

36:59

well i think that's and

37:00

that's a great question so

37:03

into kidding yourself

37:04

all uh... they're very good documentaries books like driven to

37:08

distraction sort of getting a handle on what this looks like

37:12

in people

37:15

looking at where it may have impacted so i'm not quite clear in terms of

37:20

hollis maybe showing itself

37:23

if he hasn't he's always had it

37:25

and they can become accentuated with increased demands and adults life like

37:29

our lives are all more complicated as we get a

37:33

adult if you guys have got to look forward to going out scare them

37:37

extensions of uh... so can make as you were saying anything look like it's a

37:41

little bit worse

37:42

then i would go to my my family doctor

37:45

and say you know i was diagnosed before re-evaluate and see if they still have

37:49

some symptoms and i would start to explore that

37:52

the other thing i would suggest is take somebody else along

37:55

when you go to the the family don't read it sell

37:58

mccarran missing in our lives the way she always was so

38:01

assorted refer to this is a garlic disorder enough people don't really know

38:05

that they've got it for the people around the lake well aware of

38:09

piece in the characteristics and that second hand out well that's very nice

38:13

maria director photography simple here the last person in the boat

38:18

we've known for a while he's alright alright okay i think it is really cool

38:22

birthday that evidence and family doctors now are very skilled because

38:26

we've seen kids in adolescents so if you're a twenty twenty five two seven

38:30

it's not a big extrapolation

38:32

say okay maybe you do have this man

38:35

become an informed consumer around the treatments

38:38

advocate strongly for yourself

38:40

and worked at it with edits a fifty fifty relationship with the doctrine on

38:44

the treatments it's alright absolute attend because aram

38:53

in their daily life for their living whether no are they properly now

38:58

with the job that you're doing because the possibly they're trying to do

39:02

something that they're really not meant to do and uh... i think you do have to

39:06

take that reflect them up and say

39:09

you know in my putting money at african to the right thing because yes it is

39:13

very interesting

39:15

and around so maybe this person is doing something that the might not be done

39:20

poem meant it to do in your life

39:23

people he t_v_ pt

39:25

that's a great segue people dvd can do other people do

39:29

that often is the amount of energy they have to pump into their lives

39:33

to accomplish that so this gentleman may be doing alright that's the amount of

39:37

time an effort and energy he's having to put into his life just to keep afloat

39:40

right and i must wonder why it looks so easy for everybody else only it's not

39:44

for them have high schools teachers of a member of educators with age t

39:49

and what with taken on a t_v_ teacher

39:52

maybe a couple of hours to do

39:54

my guys who take four or five hours and it's very vexing impasse in self-esteem

39:59

just takes them longer than get there

40:01

so that might be another of

40:03

serve the treatment target

40:05

to keep that time

40:06

time down

40:07

we have a question here from wendy in toronto does a_d_d_ have an impact on

40:11

causing oregon faster baiting depression

40:14

due to goals and dreams not achieved during one's lifetime

40:19

daniel would you like to temporarily says im go w s phone

40:24

we're doing is struggling with your dreams and

40:26

when you got this disorder in the way it's almost as if you always feel like

40:30

you're a little bit behind everybody else you almost feel like

40:33

you wonder if there's something wrong with you like r_u_ lacking some sort of

40:38

basic instinctive everybody else just seems to grasp it almost all at least be

40:42

grasping at straws

40:45

justin understand why

40:48

alright indus eighty delete a depression

40:51

uh...

40:52

i think eighty d

40:54

leads to low self esteem

40:56

i think it leads to the moralizing shin

41:00

feeling of being overwhelmed

41:02

and uh...

41:03

aptitude no under treatment

41:04

because these guys have tons of abilities

41:07

so it's a deal with

41:09

syndrome not dead on arrival god to moralizing overwhelmed an aptitude and

41:14

achievement

41:15

so if you had that chronically in your life across the timeline

41:18

yeah that would that would cause a lot of lord mood now separate from that are

41:23

these are the conditions which could come along like major

41:26

depressive disorder

41:27

and sometimes treating with other medicines

41:30

or long with the a t_v_ couldn't make a big difference in people's lives we see

41:34

a lot of females

41:36

part go unrecognized karen i had this conversation allot of women go

41:40

unrecognized with this

41:42

often they'll present with an anxiety or mood problems and

41:45

the doctor said okay that's what it is

41:47

but she still has a lot of big dream innocence organization of forgetfulness

41:51

that she's always there

41:53

in the any depressants don't help that and she still feels very unrequited in

41:56

her life

41:58

so one

41:58

i think a trip on both sides low self esteem but also may be other conditions

42:02

which milk a separate treatment alright

42:04

i don't think a lot when you were arm

42:07

young when your child in school you had certain accommodations

42:12

what do you need now is an adult

42:15

from

42:16

one thing

42:17

notes that stayed steady since i was a kid since i was a child in terms of

42:21

commendations would be

42:22

just extra time

42:25

they still haven't really quite gotten a grasp of how long it's going to take me

42:28

to do so and so if i can exam

42:31

appearance

42:32

twenty five questions with cerebral com

42:37

being our into the exam realize that i'm only on the second question bangkok

42:41

smooths

42:42

it's it's like that

42:44

sometimes some

42:46

like mine on the same time

42:48

you can't eat you can hyper focus because actually enjoy doing since

42:52

mister thing and then i'd alone usually do very well on the bomb

42:56

because i can and they kazaa and and intrigued by the stimulation it's just a

43:01

lot of stimulation right at that time in it and i love that guides and that's

43:04

where i feel like sela most ads and it's right there so it's a really challenge

43:08

myself to do it

43:10

and it takes a lot of me but i love it

43:13

one what i find is that i get so into it that is to lose concept of time i was

43:17

concept of everything else by organization like my writing always gets

43:20

a lot sloppy or a cousin running really fast trying to get my ideas out

43:24

go to read through it in a missing forwards and

43:27

that sort of thing so

43:29

when i can when i when i do really upon myself to that uh... ends up

43:35

still and distracted and still and disorganized ok one

43:40

so if you have time time extra time has definitely always there

43:45

undp is at something you can ask for university

43:48

yes i think there are no stationarity on status of the essence of fairly common

43:52

ones and retrain finance radon

43:55

wealthy assignments it's it's about

43:57

giving yourself an extra time and realize okay i'm not going to go out

44:00

tonight anthony display right now you're working now no yet what accomodations do

44:04

you need in the workplace to make it better

44:05

uh... actually i've been on

44:07

i am fortunate enough to work in an environment that's that is quite

44:11

stimulating on the spot sort of thing i'm working on

44:15

building this kind of thing for actually t_v_ studios in the house

44:18

go around and around this is that send bright

44:22

commercials and just different things like that and it's basically right now

44:24

i'm just like a labor like helping people but anything they need so

44:28

uh... i can be doing so in a couple of times

44:32

disco daily tasks that i go through them is not on the list or anything but i

44:35

just go and check around the shop to see what needs to be done saluted and it's

44:39

not a huge changes all the time right source and then the carpenter may call

44:43

me and say can you help me with this really quickly and ironically all

44:46

different things and i can you know like and i do agree with them and it only

44:51

takes maybe a vote

44:52

five minutes each aspect

44:54

some take longer but you know they come always stimulated antenna stimulation of

44:59

which is great

45:00

and i actually find i work two jobs work that john full-time

45:04

end i have uh... part-time job at the bush than ever

45:07

to the movie theatre m

45:09

and i work there maybe only about

45:12

for five hours a shift and i find that i get so much more tired working there

45:15

because there's less to do

45:17

and i do lifting to the like pieces of steel gregg z you know like because the

45:23

exactly because i can look around milwaukee what can i do and just really

45:26

know what you're here till five

45:28

give yourself sewing to do and

45:31

okay they must love u haha

45:34

we have another question here from kate in toronto

45:37

my son has a dat is now it it and is now in great wealth my husband and i

45:41

disagree as to how much support we should give him in terms of making sure

45:44

he does his homework

45:46

over the years we have provided a lot of tools for him i think that we need to

45:50

start to back off so that he can develop his own system to survive in university

45:54

and after that in the work force

45:56

but we don't want to see him fail what is the right approach

46:00

this question is for you carolina regularly ah... it's a very difficult

46:05

balance that you have to here you're always walking that line and i i i think

46:09

you're walking that link everyday

46:11

and the the situation painters

46:14

come on

46:15

ongoing basis so you know in our own

46:18

i really haven't stopped being a parent even though i have to sort of move

46:23

myself away i hope that by eft i'd have informed him enough to given him the

46:28

enough skills that he can advocate for himself

46:31

and that these people can can do that for their son and give him the

46:35

empowerment to go ahead forward and work on his own it's certainly possible but

46:41

grown as a parent gate you can't just stand back in just al you're going to

46:45

feel bike story i did my job the can't right now so

46:49

i think it is almost always a balance and i'll just have to know went to give

46:54

a little more going to take a little back but it's something that you do

46:57

every day

46:59

it's a great it's a great question

47:01

is considering another no i've seen thousands of great mothers and the keep

47:06

pitch enough for the kids

47:09

the issue going to call each though that's a big transitional one from grade

47:13

twelve first university the dropout rate with untreated eighty

47:16

steve's nantes

47:18

that's pretty significant

47:19

always multiple demands an executive functioning

47:22

looking after yourself all distractions

47:25

lots of drugs and alcohol binge drinking in universe in college all of that

47:29

so i think that's a very vulnerable period

47:32

and i would be pulling back at that point

47:35

a_d_d_ people can do what other people do it takes them longer to acquire those

47:39

skills

47:40

and i think that particular bridge is a very very calicut one

47:45

op

47:46

at our clinics we see a lot of kits from various universities have dropped out

47:50

for the first year

47:51

he could produce course loans untreated they're leaving everything to the

47:55

hospital mint

47:56

how were they learn the skills

47:58

advocacy it at the university health centers is fine

48:03

but they need help to learn how to

48:06

advocate for themselves and be consistent

48:09

with a lot of these actions as a lot of chronic inconsistent sir

48:13

consistent inconsistency asked with haiti

48:16

and on

48:17

you know i think universe is like a drop it's a very demanding job and i think

48:20

for people with a_t_t_ it's fair chance although mother ship the parrot should

48:24

stay involved why would stay involved

48:26

okay well yeah i totally agree with talia iraq and i i i i'm personally and

48:31

looking at him leaving

48:32

to go to bc we've heard that is very scary consultant we're spending this

48:36

year

48:38

developing a lot of this type of you know thinking in right so i don't see

48:44

how where where it's going to going to take this entire year to do that for him

48:48

to go that far away okay

48:50

we have our phone call from marlena enought awhile

48:53

hi marlena

48:57

marlena

49:02

all i hear something now i'm on a nightmare

49:06

finally now welcome to the show

49:09

what's your question

49:12

it didn't work

49:13

some conflict between

49:17

attention deficit charger

49:19

and had fight poverty doctors particularly in we hope everything that

49:23

i was wondering if you look at the time princes life

49:28

when they are visible tourette

49:30

for example

49:32

detailing your to continue misdeeds

49:35

you know your threshold if at all trucks again in your twenties you're really

49:39

twenty-three year needle looking after you

49:42

and then in your thirties when you're at least sexual peak

49:46

that the threat of marker point but that look for

49:50

banknote pingback polarity

49:52

right

49:53

and i'm putting tactic unpaired that linked to that

49:57

if you have operation would hyperactive kids ordered

50:01

i'm co-starred

50:04

by the time to bring the picture has become too much of the instantly

50:08

abilities to inhibit one speech

50:11

more attractive and i was just wondering

50:15

institu infantile

50:18

fumes toh or misdiagnosed okay thank you that's a great question let me know

50:22

thanks

50:23

until differed in recruit christian

50:26

so

50:27

it's called colour bidding so eighty h_d_ trial for the onset

50:32

the issue of childhood bipolar disorders very controversial

50:36

however is very clear that people who have trouble on city xti

50:41

could later developed bipolar dance around the age of eighteen nineteen

50:45

the bipolar becomes part of an issue

50:48

and we did it recent right review in our files and uh... of

50:51

all of our files about forty five

50:54

of these files revealed by portent too which is from the milder version of my

50:58

parcel

50:59

because this villains looting this before with disorders and zones

51:05

bipolar is a mood disorders they have to have mood symptoms depression and the

51:09

reverse of that which is mania

51:12

eighty d doesn't have any mood symptoms there can be irritability and more

51:16

frustration tolerance

51:18

but then people very quickly get over that

51:20

and it's you know the facts

51:22

to base line and we also going on my goodness what went on

51:27

bipolar is a very different issue

51:29

protracted periods of real depression withdrawal sadness

51:33

and end the flip about that manic symptoms

51:36

so age t doesn't have mood symptoms and that's the discriminating

51:41

there are speech doesn't change their sexual doesn't change

51:46

energy levels are at risk

51:47

so invite or all of these things are influx depending on

51:50

what kind of mood swing their actual m sonar clinics the summit comes in sicily

51:55

predominate my main thing main problem is

51:58

mood swings then i'm starting to think about the bipolar right off the top

52:02

right okay

52:03

we have a phone call from james in toronto hijinks

52:07

hyder hi there

52:08

you can go ahead with your question

52:11

located

52:13

okay my question really

52:17

digital technology internet about the people of color et cetera

52:24

potential impact classification dede htn perhaps even that may be off topic march

52:29

abroad

52:31

distraction

52:34

have red

52:36

and uh...

52:37

spending uh... too much time reading on the internet persist pieper

52:41

seriously impact

52:43

here's your randall development

52:46

and i'm just wondering where

52:48

the increasing interest in tow

52:52

spending time online oppose various

52:55

media

52:57

if that happened it correct complicated compromise concentration

53:02

from home to keep your peppers sales

53:05

thank you that's interesting what do you think kim

53:09

you can certainly complicate

53:11

of the course of eighty eight steve blue in our book we've looked at internet

53:14

addiction

53:15

we call it the addiction because actually mutated to

53:18

gameboy and

53:20

playing brick breaker on your own black parents so forth

53:23

but the data from china and korea is that clearly people if they teach here

53:27

much more prone to internet addiction

53:30

we screen for that in our clinics

53:33

now where they're spending huge amounts of time

53:36

on the computer

53:37

would

53:39

have a pseudo kind of a media thinkers

53:41

is not something that we know scientifically

53:44

but we certainly know that people with a beach here much more prone to internet

53:48

addiction

53:48

and that's that

53:50

constant source of novelty

53:52

and as they can spend

53:54

inordinate amounts of time world warcraft starcraft a

53:57

you know whatever counter-strike sixty eight hours no bathroom breaks all about

54:03

one so that's why we we kind of dispute this attention deficit

54:07

kind of title because those guys have lots of attention for that right

54:11

my research and people that i've i've met along the way

54:15

there are a lot of people who work in the digital world that are a_t_t_ and

54:20

the excel the hours of it right there were so yes

54:24

right right them so i mean you're reacting to have to take a look at the

54:27

flip side always in the

54:29

certainly there can be the downside

54:31

bikes again you can make it work for you

54:34

we have an email question here from toronto someone who was married to

54:39

someone with a d_h_ d

54:41

what suggestions do you have for someone who is struggling with the styles who is

54:44

eighty h d and a child with a d_h_ d it's not fun always being the

54:49

responsible one

54:52

is really really tough for me

54:55

but eight p_b_h_g_ is is in my family are obviously m

55:00

and i think and testing great knowing i think not the most of my young

55:04

fixing my stepbrother was diagnosed with a you see in he's

55:08

he's the one if that's not the genetic component thought that

55:13

i watch him and his wife worked together and i see how hard she has to work to

55:19

keep him on task is ok give me some examples of what that looks like well to

55:25

expects that it is going to forget whatever he goes out the door you know

55:29

cadet

55:30

so she has to or she does she doesn't have to betsy over prepares

55:35

and so i see the attached is a very big bird and on the person

55:40

without a_t_t_

55:41

and and from you know i guess my own opinion used to have

55:47

it

55:48

doesn't mean that you are not that your irresponsible and so he doesn't mean it

55:52

because you have it that you let someone else take over all of these tasks

55:56

you have to figure out how to be and equal partner and to realize that this

56:01

is something that you have a challenge to to go through

56:05

figure out a way between the two of you what are you good at and what i might

56:09

get and then sort of work at it together unit

56:14

and i think that this person though may be struggling a lot so she has a child

56:20

dvd's psi has been

56:22

yes as you step in the middle of the often this is what we call

56:27

compensatory burden where she'll struggling to manage

56:31

the child and her own life of scott lots of things what supposed to juggle

56:36

so our

56:37

so it can really cause a tremendous amount of stress what i would suggest

56:42

is going to the pediatrician who may be treating the child

56:45

or her own family doctor and say look you know it's eighty percent genetic

56:49

of the staff of the same fall far from the tree

56:52

could we get an evaluation download because an

56:56

marital discord these women burnout

57:00

the get pulled into a negra lipsky

57:03

some of some wiesel so you know it's like having a second child

57:08

often and that's a really said stressful situation

57:11

okay what happens to add two adults who are not

57:15

who may have a beach deep in our left and right now xd what are the

57:18

consequences

57:19

soltahr

57:20

across the timeline under achievement sold dropping at a university have a lot

57:24

of people almost god the universe victory

57:28

are they kept tremendous i have a gentleman that i've treated

57:31

uh... who had tremendous abilities musical area and he ended up painting

57:35

houses which is not a bad thing

57:37

but he thought he had enough ability to be in a symphony so

57:40

way under achieved

57:42

beget tetanus total passed over for promotions

57:46

fifteen to twenty five percent twenty five thousand dollars to two to five

57:50

thousand dollars reduction in pay just because of the

57:54

misdiagnosis a page t

57:56

so there are a lot of areas where they suffer and under his chronic under

58:01

achievement

58:03

driving a car

58:05

bothersome data around agency drivers distract ability being a big issue so

58:10

increased incidence of car crashes yeah

58:13

some pretty serious consequences yeah there are several they can

58:17

even though i suspect in c so i mean as think

58:20

and getting addicted to drugs and wanted to know

58:23

pregnancies a lot of things that can happen

58:26

untreated dislike two-story street in untreated right

58:29

yeah very different stories it sounds like

58:31

how we're going to wrap your minutes i'll ask each of you what would you like

58:34

tam what would you like adults to know

58:37

about uh... what would you like people to know about adult eighty h d

58:40

uh... that it's common

58:43

that if you have somebody in your family who hasn't

58:45

and you're still struggling self-esteem is being impacted by

58:50

under achievement

58:52

for yourself

58:53

not compared to other people

58:55

that there are one wonderful treatments

58:58

that you can get help

59:00

and your life will take a different trajectory

59:03

and not to lose hope

59:05

and to to share this with the people and

59:08

be evaluated

59:10

for if you suspect that

59:12

daniel what would you like people to know about adolph eighty h d

59:16

i think it's a bad

59:18

don't go it alone

59:19

and have people yourself

59:21

and make sure you have a good team to help you out through it

59:24

confront

59:25

and if you try to go your own

59:27

you know and it is too long

59:30

what would you like people semi-fat al fayed each day

59:33

bum

59:35

one like them to me

59:37

saline what i like them to know but just the way i'd like them to approach it

59:42

missus not from a negative flight and from a primer positive light right there

59:46

because um...

59:47

we tend to look at a it's called a disorder right but what really is

59:51

ordered orders the common route and so that's

59:56

it's a different slant news everyone's different

59:58

the ruins people know that and you know in uh... in uh... i think as soon as you

60:03

stop looking at the guys that like a disease

60:05

we need to cover up and get rid of food as a personality trait

60:09

right selling that is is unique to you

60:14

and

60:15

selling that you cannot

60:17

there's many benefits there's very many benefits of love having a judy and i

60:21

think you get caught up too much on looking about how much it affects

60:25

embellish it effects your own life and how much it takes you away from doing

60:29

but you'll realize what it actually gives you a menagerie how what actually

60:33

benefits for you

60:34

and et link that can be a problem that's been just regular daily friends are

60:39

focusing on the negative aspects you know realize what's actually possible

60:42

we start realizing all that in possibilities and then you get

60:45

overwhelmed unheard

60:48

mo more effective way to approach

60:50

your whole situation thank you

60:53

karen you make the documentary lou you're here tonight what you want out

60:56

all the people to know about adult eighteen dash d well first of all that

60:59

it exists that it doesn't cally for the most part

61:04

and that's on the fifth if it does affect you then we'll sort of equity

61:10

kills words

61:12

work with that grow it and make it work with you but i think a lot of people are

61:16

afraid of changes special is a good older you may have been working in a job

61:21

for ten years moving very unhappy

61:23

but you're afraid to change to do something tapped you could work out and

61:27

you can do well

61:28

humne that's i think people have to have some courage and obtain work with that

61:33

thank you all very much thank you for your expertise and for sharing your

61:36

stories and keeping thinking my guests have been karen o'donnell ko o'donnell

61:42

daniel dejar again

61:43

and doctor timothy bell ki

61:45

you'll find more resources on eighty h_d_ including all three of karan's

61:49

documentaries on the subject right here on t_v_ o dot org

61:53

thanks for participating in the special event i'm cheryl jackson

 
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